Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: High Dynamic Range Imaging

  1. #1
    Level 1 User
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Washington DC
    Posts
    5

    Default High Dynamic Range Imaging

    hey...
    have any of you guys experimented with/looked into HDR imaging?
    I just stumbled across some blogs with HDR stuff, and thought it looked like it would lend an interesting look to some UE oriented photos.. it looks like there are plenty of ways to go about getting similar effects, but i can't really tell what's legit.. anyone do HDR? or have any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Reality Hacker Dan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    3,785

    Default

    I think HDR is cool when done right but 99.93% of all people that do it fail horribly. Any bookstore will have some HDR books in the Photography section with good tips and suggestions.

    Search Google for tips and tutorials as well.

    Any new version of photoshop can do HDRs.

    The industry leader/most popular software is prolly http://www.hdrsoft.com/

  3. #3
    Level 1 User Alex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bainbridge USNB
    Posts
    900

    Default

    This is just a few from my photobucket.. HDR
    if you would like info on how to create this pm me.





    MD/DE-crew

  4. #4
    Level 1 User Alex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bainbridge USNB
    Posts
    900

    Default

    MORE >>





    MD/DE-crew

  5. #5
    Level 3 User breviceps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Owings Mills, MD
    Posts
    1,524

    Default

    If you're a hands-on kinda person who doesn't like reading books, Penn Camera does offer classes on HDR. Here's the link.
    Failure is not defeat unless you stop trying.

  6. #6
    Level 1 User Alex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bainbridge USNB
    Posts
    900

    Default

    I find this link the best for the one who knows nothing about HDR or for someone who wants to know the entire steps from setting your camera up in the field to create the images, and then creating the HDR at home.

    http://abduzeedo.com/how-create-hdr-...matix-tutorial
    ____

    Here is another link on how to compose the HDR in photoshop.

    http://www.talkingtree.com/blog/inde...ake-hdr-images
    MD/DE-crew

  7. #7
    Level 3 User 8redrum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    451

    Default

    Here are a few of My HDR photos,
    1.


    2.


    3.


    or are they?

  8. #8
    Level 3 User Krush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Behind you
    Posts
    1,082

    Default

    Here's an HDR. I don't mess with it much.

    ECUE

  9. #9
    Level 2 User chr7s's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Abingdon, MD
    Posts
    341

    Default

    I'll do HDR's from time to time, the biggest part of it is knowing when to use it and when the software will just make the image look wacky. What kind of camera are you using? If you have auto bracket that is the easiest way to do it. When I had a D80 I would take three exposures +2, 0, -2 and merge in Photomatix. Lately I have been making "psuedo-hdr's" with one RAW file in Photomatix. This will only really work when there is a small dynamic range to start, as it cannot do much with dark shadows and highlights.

    When I first started using Photomatix I more or less played around with things until I found what worked. Once you get the hand of what does what you will know how to get the desired effect.

    Oh, and use a tripod.

  10. #10
    Level 3 User futureimpaired's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    349

    Default

    These are some of my better HDRs








  11. #11
    Level 3 User Palehorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Hagerstown, MD
    Posts
    319

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by futureimpaired View Post
    These are some of my better HDRs







    I see what you did there.

  12. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Germantown, Maryland
    Posts
    13

    Default

    I really enjoy HDRi, yet I've yet to use it in a run down building environment yet...I've used it mainly in cities at night, which creates a real cool effect...I've been using a program called Photomatix and if you go to their site, they have a useful trial edition, although it leaves large watermarks, but you get used to the program, which is quite simple...




  13. #13
    Member wearyourtruth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Baltimore
    Posts
    30

    Default

    i'm a recent learner of HDR (i just started in the past couple months) and i agree with a lot of what has been said here.

    i learned all the basics from googling tutorials, as suggested.

    there are really 2 programs for HDR and 2 ways to do it.

    program 1: photoshop (has to be at least CS2), program 2: photomatix. since i had CS2 i used that, photomatix costs $100-150 something like that, and apparently can give "better" (or at least more surreal) results, and obviously it's much cheaper if you don't have CS (adobe creative suite).

    the first way to do it is set up a tripod and shoot multiple images at different exposures. the 2nd way is to shoot in RAW and then pull out 2 more images, one over, one under exposed, and "fake" it.

    i would say the biggest rule of HDR is to NOT OVERDO IT. obviously everyone has different opinions on what is too much, but there is a point in HDR when it's just silly.

    here's a before and after of a pic i did when i was practicing. the goal should be for the HDR to be an improvement on the properly exposed image.
    original

    HDR

  14. #14
    Level 3 User futureimpaired's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    349

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wearyourtruth View Post
    here's a before and after of a pic i did when i was practicing. the goal should be for the HDR to be an improvement on the properly exposed image.
    original

    HDR
    That is a great point when the original image has a big tonal range to capture, but the one you posted didn't. You could have got that second shot from the first exposure if you just did some levels on it in post. As an added bonus, it wouldn't have the stupid glow, it would maintain clarity in the highlights, and the color cast wouldn't have been exaggerated.

    Applying HDR to the photo made it worse than if you had just post processed it correctly.

  15. #15
    Level 1 User
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    New Paltz, NY
    Posts
    4

    Default

    I really only do HDR when I have to, i.e. blown out windows and such, but I've experimented with it a bit. Here are some of mine.

    1.


    2.


    3.


    4.


    5.

  16. #16
    Level 3 User DashingFlamingos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Providence!
    Posts
    703

    Default

    I used to always to HDR after abandonedNY showed me how to, however I've grown great opposed to it, once I learned other methods of fixing blown out windows.

    Occasionally, I will like it in other's photos, but when it's tastefully done, not over done, looking like a cartoon more than a photo.
    The supreme irony of life is that hardly anyone gets out of it alive.
    Robert Heinlein (1907 - 1988), "Job", 1984

  17. #17
    Level 3 User 8redrum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    451

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DashingFlamingos View Post
    I used to always to HDR after abandonedNY showed me how to, however I've grown great opposed to it, once I learned other methods of fixing blown out windows.

    Occasionally, I will like it in other's photos, but when it's tastefully done, not over done, looking like a cartoon more than a photo.
    You learned well my young padawan. LOL

    HDR - Done right. IMO

  18. #18
    Level 3 User DashingFlamingos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Providence!
    Posts
    703

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 8redrum View Post
    You learned well my young padawan. LOL

    HDR - Done right. IMO
    Padawan? haha
    The supreme irony of life is that hardly anyone gets out of it alive.
    Robert Heinlein (1907 - 1988), "Job", 1984

  19. #19
    Level 2 User
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Mobtown
    Posts
    103

    Default

    I don't mess with it much...too many times it looks really fake. This was my first attempt, and it was made by sandwiching 3 layers then changing blending modes and masking.



    This one is more obvious.
    Still masked out with the wacom.


    I think that is the basic problem with them...making something really cool involves taking exposures with a lot of latitude, and seeing an impossible amount of latitude in one image sets off your fake detector. I guess the same is true of using a graduated ND filter, but for some reason I don't think it ends up being as objectionable.

    I used a graduated filter in LR2 on that one...still looks fake.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •