Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 55

Thread: An Explorers Guide to Threats

  1. #21
    Level 2 User
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Bethesda, MD
    Posts
    334

    Default

    ive got free medical, ill just take off the limb where the tick is.

  2. #22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by navymedic87 View Post
    ive got free medical, ill just take off the limb where the tick is.
    And Don will provide the SoCo for general anesthesia
    - has never been arrested for "Moapery"... just for the record.


    F/RoX

  3. #23
    Level 2 User
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Bethesda, MD
    Posts
    334

    Default

    i am so down

  4. #24
    Member RookieRat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Keedysville/Hagerstown MD
    Posts
    37

    Default

    Water mocasins, and copperheads are often confused with the Northern water snake, which is non-poisinous. they have almost identical patterning, so for those not VERY framiliar with the coloration i suggest you avoid all snakes. but for those of us like me who love snakes, still be carefull regardless, i almost mistook a copperhead for a harmless snake yesterday

  5. #25
    Member Doofus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Finksburg, MD
    Posts
    88

    Default

    Just a word on lyme's disease, my whole family has it. We live kinda in the woods, and I find one or two ticks daily in the summer if I'm outside at all. Actually I think all but my sister do. None of us have had any reaction to the tick bite itself, just went to the doctor for feeling real sick continuously for a few days like you would for an infection, and the blood test comes up with lyme's.
    So going "by the bullseye" doesn't really mean jack. Even if you get tested, sometimes the test will show negative now, but in 8 months yes. It hides >.>

    So it's really kinda "too much to worry about" and if you see one on you, just be sure to remove the WHOLE tick, as leaving parts behind increases the risk for infection.
    "The most profound technologies are those that disappear. They weave themselves into the fabric of everyday life until they are indistinguishable from it." - Mark Weiser

  6. #26
    Level 3 User Alyssa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Wilmington, DE
    Posts
    346

    Default

    I got lyme's disease when I was 7 or 8. I luckily was easy to diagnose because I got a very obvious bullseye, and I reacted pretty violently to it. Threw up frequently, bad fever and very dizzy; could only eat popsicles for about a week. So it just goes to show that everyone reacts differently. Really glad they caught it quick and I haven't really had any problems since, but like Doofus said, it can "hide" after a certain period of time, so it's good to atleast be aware and know what to watch out for! I live in a wooded area, so most of my family has gotten it as well, my dad actually had it twice.

  7. #27
    Level 3 User Sheva's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Sterling, VA
    Posts
    1,076

    Default

    These are really incredible write ups. Thanks Dan!

    I recently got a 3-year Wilderness First Aid certification and think a lot of the skills learned there could be applicable to explorers. If anyone is interested in information on certs and such I can certainly provide it.

  8. #28
    Level 2 User
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    k
    Posts
    20

    Default

    thanks to this thread i now know what asbestos looks like, which helped me understand what i was in for today when i saw it in the paper mill at St. Mary's "Hell House" Basically, thank you very much for this thread.

  9. #29
    Level 1 User
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1

    Default

    I'm VERY sure (100percent) that the Brown Recluse spider bite image is 100 percent photoshopped.

  10. #30
    Level 3 User lesscrafted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    WTF, Alaska
    Posts
    871

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by saturdayskids View Post
    I'm VERY sure (100percent) that the Brown Recluse spider bite image is 100 percent photoshopped.
    Can tell you it ISN'T photoshopped-- welcome to secondary infection & tissue necrosis. That photo is used in all the med school books not JUST for the bite but also for the secondary infxn that ensued. The books show what the bite looks like from day 1- day 14 or so... The fun part is they guy actually KEPT that thumb & recovered w/ minimal nerve damage... YIKES
    You CAN actually recover from the bite w/ appropriate treatment & wound packing etc.-- just worry most about the infxn part--hopefully you don't meet MRSA (Methicillin- Resistant Staphylococcus aureus) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Neither one will buy you a nice dinner

  11. #31
    Level 3 User lesscrafted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    WTF, Alaska
    Posts
    871

    Default

    Oh and lemme get on my soap box a li'l bit...As far as poison ivy & oak, *urushiol* is what kicks your @$$. It binds the the proteins in your skin & depending on your level of allergenicity & exposure-- and there are people that react worse than others--determines how badly you'll wanna kill yerself! Some of the BEST OTC products (and there is no great prescription product for treatment of poison ivy/oak-- other than some oral prednisone that will help reduce the swelling & irritation) are Zanfel which REMOVES urushiol even after it has bound to the dermal proteins-- wash the area w/ it for up to 3 minutes depending on level of effect... it's expensive but WORKS. Also can use IvyCleans or Technu (although studies w/ Technu compared Dial soap & GOOP grease remover & found them equally efficacious) The IvyCleans is nice though because it comes in packets & can be used to remove the oils from equipment. For the insane itching.. throw back some benadryl (diphenhydramine) or claritin (loratidine)... benadryl works best but make A LOT of ppl dead drowsy~~ it works for the itch though so pick yer poison! Topically, yeah.. calamine is an oldy but goody.
    Don't forget that after exposure-- make sure to cleans (in whatever way you can)before you SMOKE, go to the bathroom or anything else-- you don't want to make those places (especially) angry!

  12. #32
    Wicked Retarded Crew Descending's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    F/RoX
    Posts
    1,660

    Default

    Bee's and wasps and all kind of other things that bite and sting... Don't forget bee's... Sorry, I got stung during yesterdays trip...
    F/RoX

  13. #33
    Level 3 User lesscrafted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    WTF, Alaska
    Posts
    871

    Default

    I never do! I get tons of calls for them-- benadryl is good to have on hand-- especially liquid or orally dissolving sheet. Even if you are highly allergic to stings it will be one of the first things they hit you with. Scrape the stinger out w/ the edge of a credit card or drivers license (something like that). You can hit it with some Dermoplast (benzocaine-- nice topical anesthetic). Lastly, when it doubt.. ice works wonders.

  14. #34
    Level 1 User
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Thanks for the thread, Dan, very nice and great presentation!

  15. #35
    Level 3 User Alyssa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Wilmington, DE
    Posts
    346

    Default

    Good old calamine lotion, haha, I swallowed that stuff when I was 5 while making a "magic pink potion" it prompted a franic call from my mother to Poison control. I recovered just fine

    I'm quite familiar with Technu, worked around poison ivy all summer and it was the gardeners posion-ivy wash of choice.

  16. #36
    Level 3 User
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    newark, DE
    Posts
    791

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lesscrafted View Post
    I never do! I get tons of calls for them-- benadryl is good to have on hand-- especially liquid or orally dissolving sheet. Even if you are highly allergic to stings it will be one of the first things they hit you with. Scrape the stinger out w/ the edge of a credit card or drivers license (something like that). You can hit it with some Dermoplast (benzocaine-- nice topical anesthetic). Lastly, when it doubt.. ice works wonders.
    Thats good information right there.

  17. #37
    Wicked Retarded Crew Descending's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    F/RoX
    Posts
    1,660

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lesscrafted View Post
    I never do! I get tons of calls for them-- benadryl is good to have on hand-- especially liquid or orally dissolving sheet. Even if you are highly allergic to stings it will be one of the first things they hit you with. Scrape the stinger out w/ the edge of a credit card or drivers license (something like that). You can hit it with some Dermoplast (benzocaine-- nice topical anesthetic). Lastly, when it doubt.. ice works wonders.
    It's good to have a resident pharmacist on hard...
    F/RoX

  18. #38
    Level 3 User lesscrafted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    WTF, Alaska
    Posts
    871

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Descending View Post
    It's good to have a resident pharmacist on hard...
    Aww, say it again, only slower & dirtier... hehehe

  19. #39
    Level 3 User Doomed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fredrock, MD
    Posts
    1,629

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lesscrafted View Post
    Aww, say it again, only slower & dirtier... hehehe
    hahaha... thats funny...
    "I'm coming down fast, but I'm miles above you."

  20. #40
    Level 1 User
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    7

    Default Hantavirus

    While not particularly common, and ignored over much of the US, hantavirus is the real deal for folks like us, as it comes from rodent waste. Out here in the West, it has been known for 15 years or so, but knowledge is slowly spreading. if you are infected with hanta, there basically no treatment except to keep you full of fluids, warm and dry, and hope you recover.

    Wear your respirators! Wash possibly contaminated clothes immediately! For more info, see the link below:

    http://www.hantavirus.net/

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •