View Poll Results: Cameras owned or extensively used.

Voters
34. You may not vote on this poll
  • Canon EOS D30

    0 0%
  • Canon EOS-1D

    0 0%
  • Canon EOS-1Ds

    0 0%
  • Canon EOS D60

    1 2.94%
  • Canon EOS 10D

    2 5.88%
  • Canon EOS 300D / Digital Rebel

    5 14.71%
  • Canon EOS-1D Mark II

    0 0%
  • Canon EOS 20D

    6 17.65%
  • Canon EOS 350D / Digital Rebel XT

    17 50.00%
  • Canon EOS-1Ds Mark II

    0 0%
  • Canon EOS 5D

    6 17.65%
  • Canon EOS 30D

    7 20.59%
  • Canon EOS 400D / Digital Rebel XTi

    8 23.53%
  • Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III

    0 0%
  • Canon EOS 40D

    4 11.76%
  • Canon EOS 450D

    3 8.82%
  • Canon EOS 1000D

    1 2.94%
  • Canon EOS 50D

    1 2.94%
  • Canon EOS 5D Mark II

    2 5.88%
  • Canon EOS 500D

    1 2.94%
Multiple Choice Poll.
Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: THE Canon DSLR Thread

  1. #1
    Reality Hacker Dan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    3,785

    Default THE Canon DSLR Thread

    ***UNDER CONSTRUCTION***
    Listed in order of release date.
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS D30 (10/10/2000)
    3 MP CMOS sensor (1.6 crop)
    Long awaited. Canon first revealed the EOS-D30 at PMA this year (with a "tentative launch of Fall 2000"), they then later made it official and published full specifications and we got our first hands on with the D30, though at that stage Canon weren't comfortable enough with the image quality to allow samples to be published. In August we published an exclusive preview article with the first large set of samples available on the web.
    So why is the D30 so special? Lots of reasons, it's Canon's first "home grown" digital SLR, built from the ground up to be a digital SLR, their previous forays into the digital SLR world, the EOS-D2000 and EOS-D6000 were joint ventures with Kodak (Canon bodies with Kodak internals), these cameras are also known as the DCS520 and DCS560.
    The D30 comes fully loaded, filled with features and functionality you'd expect of a camera teetering on the edge of wearing a "Pro" badge (and probably more deserving than some of those that do), add to this the fact that Canon threw a curved ball by using the first ever multi-megapixel CMOS sensor to be seen in a production camera and you can see why the EOS-D30 is significant.
    The other thing that makes the EOS-D30 special is that it (like the Fujifilm S1 Pro) is helping to open up the "prosumer digital SLR" market, the retail $3,000 may not be considered cheap, but there are considerable numbers of non professionals who can afford (and no doubt will buy) the EOS-D30.
    What's the competition? Well, there's Nikon's D1, though Canon have been careful to distance the D30 from the D1, the D1 was designed as a professional tool, as such it's faster and better built than the D30, but with it being "Nikons digital SLR" there are bound to be comparisons. The other camera in the digital SLR market is Fujifilm's S1 Pro, based on a Nikon F60 (N60) 35mm body featuring Fujifilm's 3.2 megapixel SuperCCD (generating a 6 megapixel image file) and Fujifilm's own digital electronics in the "back".
    For Canon EOS owners the D30 must surely be a very attractive way into the digital realm, Canon have been very careful, they know that many long term customers will buy D30's, and that's why although beta cameras have been around for a while there's been a long delay for full production units to appear. It's got to be just right.
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS-1D (12/13/2001)
    4.5 MP CCD sensor (1.3 crop)
    Canon's EOS-1D is the first professional digital SLR from Canon since the EOS-D2000 (introduced in March 1998 which was a collaborative effort with Kodak, also known as the Kodak DCS 520). Indeed, the EOS-1D is the first all Canon professional digital SLR. Canon themselves admit that after the EOS-D2000 they were caught dragging their heels somewhat when Nikon released the D1 but believe that they are coming back strong with the 4 megapixel 8 fps EOS-1D.
    The EOS-1D is based on the excellent (and highly praised) EOS-1V professional film SLR. The 1D's body is almost identical to an EOS-1V with the additional powerdrive booster attached. The primary differences are the EOS-1D's battery and vertical grip have now become a moulded part of the camera body, and of course that the back of the camera hosts an LCD monitor with variety of 'digital' controls and buttons.
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS-1Ds (12/17/2002)
    11 MP CMOS sensor (full frame)
    The EOS-1Ds is Canon's newest professional SLR. Based on the EOS-1D body the EOS-1Ds raises resolution to 11 megapixels, uses a CMOS sensor (just like the EOS-D30 and D60) and is the first Canon digital SLR with a sensor which captures a full 35 mm frame.
    Last year Canon introduced the EOS-1D, it was the first professional digital SLR since the EOS-D2000 which was a collaboration with Kodak. The EOS-1D has a 4 megapixel sensor and can capture at an amazing 8 frames per second, clearly targeted at the sports photographer. The EOS-1Ds covers almost every other type of photography, from landscape to portrait, photo journalism to weddings. The ability to use 35 mm lenses at their designed focal length (field of view) combined with the high pixel count will be strong points for those film photographers who have hesitated on going the digital route because of these two issues. The 1Ds is capable of shooting at wider angle than any other digital SLR (at least until the actual release of Kodak's DCS-14n).
    The EOS-1Ds body is based around the EOS-1V professional film SLR. From a size point of view the 1Ds body is almost identical to an EOS-1V with the additional powerdrive booster attached. The base of the camera contains the large battery pack and allows for the integration of a vertical (portrait) hand grip and control system. Build quality is superb, the entire body moulded from magnesium alloy with environmental seals around every compartment door, terminal, connector and button.
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS D60 (3/24/2002)
    6.3 MP CMOS sensor (1.6 crop)
    Canon announced the EOS-D60 two days before PMA 2002. That's exactly two years since the EOS-D30 was first announced, although that seems like a long time ago the D30 didn't hit the streets until the end of 2000 (early 2001 in some countries) and so remained a tempting enigma for most of 2000. The D60's launch was mostly anticipated by D30 owners (and those who follow sites like ours) and most appear to be relatively happy with the majority of improvements made.
    The biggest and most obvious difference of course being the new six megapixel sensor, and that drags the D30 'system' into the major league as far as digital SLR resolution is concerned (at the time of writing this review). Although the D60 made an impact at PMA it wasn't the only new kid on the block, just a day before Canon's announcement of the EOS-D60 Nikon announced their consumer level D100 six megapixel digital SLR, with a slightly better feature set and otherwise a similar market target the D100 and EOS-D60 are set to go head to head this year.
    The battle started early, with neither manufacturer announcing an official price for the cameras at PMA, instead began a game of poker with many rumours and price changes for almost two weeks after the show. Things, though have both calmed down and taken a very attractive turn. Canon announced that the new EOS-D60 would be priced (in the US) at US$2,199 for the full kit (includes battery, charger, DC kit) and just US$1,999 for the basic body (no battery etc.). This appears to have undercut the rumoured US$2,500 for the D100. Nikon haven't as yet announced their official pricing.
    At this stage we don't have a D100, it looks like it will definitely be more than a month away and thus at this time I'm not in a position to use it for comparison in this review. HOWEVER, when I review the D100 I'll definitely use a D60 for comparison purposes, and that will serve to be the head to head between the two cameras.
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS 10D (3/31/2003)
    6.3 MP CMOS sensor (1.6 crop)
    A year on and just as they did with the EOS-D60 Canon announced its successor, the EOS-10D two days before the start of the PMA show. In total it's three years since the original EOS-D30 was announced (although only two since it hit the streets). The EOS-D30 was a camera which changed the face (and price) of digital SLR's for good. At first glance the EOS-10D looks quite similar to the D60 however the changes are fairly significant. Immediately noticeable, especially when you first pick up the EOS-10D is the new magnesium alloy case and restyled softer shape. The body is now made from the same material s the EOS-1D/1Ds and shares quite a few style pointers from those cameras. In this respect many people will see the EOS-10D as the baby EOS-1Ds.
    Canon haven't stopped however with the new body and control layout, there are new features like an orientation sensor, improved auto focus (something that really needed addressing), a new and improved LCD monitor, Kelvin selectable white balance, an extended ISO range, more flexible image parameters and interestingly a new manufacturing process for the CMOS sensor. Without a doubt the other most significant thing about the EOS-10D is the price, this camera is already for sale (and shipping) with at US$1,500.
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS 300D / Digital Rebel (9/4/2003)
    6.3 MP CMOS sensor (1.6 crop)
    On 20th August 2003 Canon surprised many people (not least us) when it announced its $899 / €1,099 EOS 300D (Digital Rebel). This digital SLR based on the EOS 10D's superb six megapixel CMOS sensor and image processor in an inexpensive consumer body similar to the film EOS-300. This camera is designed to take the prosumer end of the digital camera market by storm, everyone is fully aware of the image quality of the EOS 10D (considered by many as the benchmark six megapixel digital SLR), and so a consumer priced digital SLR based on the same sensor is irrefutably attractive to anyone who would have previously considered an 'all in one' prosumer digital cameras.
    This camera is probably the most fundamentally important step for digital SLR's since the introduction of the Nikon D1. It will place digital SLR's into the hands of consumers (with a moderate budget) and will probably also have a very strong negative effect on the $1,000 prosumer digital camera market. Especially considering that the Kit price which includes the new EF-S 18 - 55 mm (3x) lens costs just $100 / €100 more.
    The EOS 300D's plastic body is just one of the elements used to reduce the cost of the camera, others include the use of a pentamirror in the viewfinder instead of a pentaprism, a reduction of features (although I feel that much of this is simply firmware crippling) and a shifting of manufacturing from Japan to Taiwan. Additionally Canon say that they have altered the production process of the CMOS sensor to reduce costs.
    To give the camera more consumer appeal Canon has also replaced the EOS 10D's neutral image parameters with a new default set called 'Parameter 1' which defines Contrast, Saturation and Sharpness as +1. Adjustment to Contrast and Saturation have the same power as the EOS 10D, however the EOS 300D's sharpness is twice as strong as the EOS 10D. Thus the EOS 300D's "Parameter 1" is the same as Contrast +1, Saturation +1, Sharpness +2 on the EOS 10D. The EOS 10D's 'Standard' setting is called 'Parameter 2' on the EOS 300D.
    In addition to this the EOS 300D is the first Canon digital SLR to support a new lens called the EF-S (S = short back focus), this has the same mount and electrical contacts as an EF lens but has a rear element which fits further into the camera allowing it to be closer to the image sensor. The lens elements can also be reduced in size as the imaging circle does not need to be as large, thus EF-S lenses should be smaller and lighter than their 35 mm equivalents. Note that EF-S lenses can only be used on the EOS 300D (so far) as no other EOS camera supports the EF-S mount.
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS-1D Mark II (6/14/2004)
    16.7 MP CMOS sensor (1.3 crop)
    The new Canon EOS-1D Mark II is the successor to the Canon EOS-1D which was announced and introduced at the end of 2001. This new generation of digital SLR almost doubles resolution with its new eight megapixel CMOS sensor, doubles the size of the continuous shooting buffer. Despite the advertised 8.5 fps the EOS-1D Mark II actually shoots at a maximum of 8.3 fps (the same as the EOS-1D).
    The EOS-1D Mark II is also obviously Canon's answer to Nikon's fast shooting D2H announced last year, it does appear however as though Canon are raising the bar with resolution and one would hope we can expect similar low noise performance from its CMOS sensor as we have seen from the same technology in the EOS 10D.
    Putting the additional resolution and buffer size to one side there are also a variety of improvements and changes compared to the EOS-1D, not least of which a new version of Canon's DIGIC image processor, an extension of selectable ISO sensitivity, support for Secure Digital as well as Compact Flash and the addition of a USB port (although only USB 1.1). The SD slot and USB connector are interesting additions as they may hint towards potential future add-ons for this camera such as a wireless kit (pure speculation on my part at this stage).
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS 20D (11/3/2004)
    8.2 MP CMOS sensor (1.6 crop)
    It's been four years and four months since they revealed the EOS D30, the first digital SLR which amateur photographers could really afford. So here we are, 52 months later with the latest incarnation of that original design, the eight megapixel EOS 20D. Not since February 2002 (the EOS D60) has Canon increased the resolution of this line of digital SLRs, in the EOS 20D we have a 1.9 million effective pixel increase, a new AF system, 50% faster continuous shooting and more than double the buffer space.
    First impressions of the EOS 20D are good, it feels far less 'prosumer like' and instead feels more like a 'baby EOS-1D' (as described by one of our team). Gone are some of the annoyances of the EOS 10D, the 20D now switches on virtually instantly and focuses quickly, it feels very solid and yet weighs slightly less than the model it replaces. So far so good.
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS 350D / Digital Rebel XT (4/6/2005)
    8.0 MP CMOS sensor (1.6 crop)
    On 20th August 2003 Canon dropped a bomb into the digital SLR market with the six megapixel sub-$1,000 EOS 300D (Digital Rebel). Eighteen months later and just in time for the largest trade show of the year (PMA 2005) Canon has revealed the successor to the 300D, the new, smaller, eight megapixel, EOS 350D (Digital Rebel XT). At first you'd be forgiven for thinking this was just a drop-in upgrade of the EOS 300D with the EOS 20D's eight megapixel sensor, but in actual fact it has a new CMOS sensor (it's 8.0 megapixels versus the 20D's 8.2 megapixels), the 350D also has a smaller body, re-worked design, DIGIC II, new features and custom functions.
    Global production of the EOS 300D started at 70,000 units per month, this was increased to 100,000 units per month a few months later. Canon clearly have big plans for the EOS 350D because they will be start production at 130,000 units per month (which is almost twice the initial production level for the EOS 300D).
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS-1Ds Mark II (10/11/2005)
    16.7 MP CMOS sensor (full frame)
    The EOS-1Ds Mark II is the sixteen (point seven) megapixel successor to the EOS-1Ds which was announced almost exactly two years earlier. Carrying on from the EOS-1Ds the Mark II has a full size 35 mm (36 x 24 mm) sensor which means it introduces no field-of-view crop, an 18 mm lens on this camera will provide exactly the same field-of-view as it would on a 35 mm film camera. At first glance it's clear to see that Canon has stuck (as they did with the EOS-1D Mark II) with the same body and control layout. The timing of the EOS-1Ds Mark II's announcement was interesting if not totally surprising coming just five days after Nikon announced the twelve (point four) megapixel D2X, the megapixel one-up-man-ship continues.
    Despite the significant jump in resolution from the EOS-1Ds (11 mp) to the EOS-1Ds Mark II (16.7 mp) the camera maintains an impressive four frames per second shooting rate and a buffer large enough for 32 JPEG or 11 RAW images. The EOS-1Ds Mark II's internal bus throughput of approximately 67 megapixel/sec is virtually identical to the eight megapixel EOS-1D Mark II.
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS 5D (11/12/2005)
    12.8 MP CMOS sensor (full frame)
    Canon's press material for the EOS 5D states that it 'defines (a) new D-SLR category', while we're not typically too concerned with marketing talk this particular statement is clearly pretty accurate. The EOS 5D is unlike any previous digital SLR in that it combines a full-frame (35 mm sized) high resolution sensor (12.8 megapixels) with a relatively compact body (slightly larger than the EOS 20D, although in your hand it feels noticeably 'chunkier'). The EOS 5D is aimed to slot in between the EOS 20D and the EOS-1D professional digital SLR's, an important difference when compared to the latter is that the EOS 5D doesn't have any environmental seals. While Canon don't specifically refer to the EOS 5D as a 'professional' digital SLR it will have obvious appeal to professionals who want a high quality digital SLR in a body lighter than the EOS-1D. It will also no doubt appeal to current EOS 20D owners (although lets hope they've not bought too many EF-S lenses...)
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS 30D (4/4/2006)
    8.2 MP CMOS sensor (1.6 crop)
    The model line in which the EOS 30D sits has seen a total of five models, each offering either an upgrade in features, resolution or both. From the EOS D30 to D60 we saw a doubling in megapixel count as well as numerous feature upgrades, from the EOS 10D to 20D again we saw an increase in megapixel count and performance (continuous shooting up to five frames per second). So eighteen months after the EOS 20D comes the EOS 30D, which honestly has to be one of the least exciting upgrades so far. The real headline improvements are a larger LCD monitor, standardizing on 'Picture Style', spot metering, third stop ISO selection and selectable continuous shooting speeds. Despite this subtle update there's still a huge amount of interest around this model, Canon has taken the "if it ain't broken don't fix it" approach to the image pipeline, the EOS 30D has the same sensor and image processor (DIGIC II) as the EOS 20D, and that camera has for the eight megapixel digital SLR benchmark since it was introduced.
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS 400D / Digital Rebel XTi (10/14/2006)
    10.1 MP CMOS sensor (1.6 crop)
    Almost exactly three years since Canon changed the digital SLR market forever (with the $1,000 EOS 300D) they announced the third generation of their affordable entry level series, the EOS 400D (Digital Rebel XTi). This new camera follows the design of the EOS 350D, being very compact and relatively lightweight but not compromising on manual controls or in-use performance. The headline changes are another two megapixel step up (to ten megapixels), the nine-point AF sensor from the EOS 30D, a new dust removal system which includes anti-static surface coatings, low-pass filter vibration and software based dust pattern removal. Less important but just as noticeable are the removal of the status LCD, replaced instead by a camera settings screen on the now larger 2.5" LCD monitor and the eye proximity sensor just below the viewfinder to turn this off when composing your shot.
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III (8/20/2007)
    21.1 MP CMOS sensor (full frame)
    The EOS-1Ds Mark III becomes the seventh Canon professional EOS-1D series digital SLR, although only the third of the 's' suffix sub-category which indicates a full frame sensor. Three years since the last EOS-1Ds, the Mark II, the Mark III pushes digital SLR resolution over the twenty megapixel barrier with specifically twenty-one-point-one million pixels (5616 x 3744) on its 36 x 24 mm (full 35 mm frame) sensor. Canon also claim to have increased the 'light gathering efficiency' of the sensor by reducing the amount of (wasted) space between microlenses, hence despite the resolution increase the Mark III still provides sensitivity up to ISO 3200 (with boost enabled).
    As well as increasing resolution Canon has pushed continuous shooting up a step with five frames per second over the Mark II's four frames per second. This means that at full speed the two DIGIC III image processors are dealing with an impressive 185 MB/sec. Other improvements include the larger screen, Live View, a fourteen-bit A/D converter and fourteen-bit RAW files, UDMA Compact Flash support (up to 45 MB/sec) and a whole range of features (such as dual storage slots and Picture Styles) inherited from the EOS-1D Mark III.
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS 40D (10/24/2007)
    10.1 MP CMOS sensor (1.6 crop)
    The EOS 40D becomes the sixth Canon 'prosumer' digital SLR, a line which started back in 2000 with the EOS D30, and how far we've come. It's been eighteen months since the EOS 30D and although on the surface the 40D looks like a fairly subtle upgrade there's a lot that makes this an even better camera. Of course we expect a step up in megapixels, and so the 40D comes with a ten million pixel CMOS sensor with the same sort of dust reduction as the EOS 400D, an ultrasonic platform which shakes the low pass filter. Other improvements bring the EOS 40D closer into line with the EOS-1D series, these include a move to the same page-by-page menu system, both RAW and sRAW (2.5 MP), 14-bit A/D converter and 14-bit RAW, cross-type AF points for F5.6 or faster lenses, a larger and brighter viewfinder, interchangeable focusing screens, a larger LCD monitor (3.0") and faster continuous shooting (6.5 fps).
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS-450D (XSi) (1/24/2008)
    12.2-megapixel CMOS sensor (1.6 crop)
    Four and a half years have passed since the first affordable digital SLR from Canon; the EOS 300D (Digital Rebel). In that time we have witnessed two further iterations (the EOS 350D and EOS 400D) leading up to today's fourth generation EOS 450D, with twice the megapixel count of the original (twelve versus six) in a smaller body with a far wider range of functionality and features and a $200 lower list price. Since those heady days in 2004 when the EOS 300D was the only kid on the block we've seen Nikon, Pentax and Olympus all attempt to hit the same sweet spot of size, features and price at the 'lower end' of the DSLR market, with varying degrees of success. Without a doubt the EOS 450D will have to do more today to prove itself in an increasingly crowded market.
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS-1000D (XS) (6/10/2008)
    10.1-megapixel CMOS sensor (1.6 crop)
    When Canon launched the EOS 300D back in 2003 it was widely regarded as the first affordable digital SLR and secured Canon a seemingly indomitable number-one spot in the market. Since then the 'small' Canon has gone through three further iterations and the current model - the EOS 450D - offers a feature set and image quality that could only have been dreamed about five years ago (and at a price point well below the 300D's). However, the competition haven't been idle spectators and have recently launched a number of de-spec'ed cameras that have redefined the entry level segment and undercut the EOS 450D in the DSLR hierarchy. Canon has now responded to this mounting pressure by launching a new model one tier below the 450D in its current lineup - the EOS 1000D. It shares bits and pieces with Rebels gone by and, depending from which angle you look at it, the new model is either a stripped down 450D or a 'reheated' 400D. It's a lower specification camera than the 450D, by every measure you might see listed on the shop shelf, but is not the huge step down that its market positioning might lead you to expect.
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS-50D (8/26/2008)
    15.1 Megapixel CMOS sensor (1.6 crop)
    Almost exactly a year after the arrival of the EOS 40D, Canon has announced the 50D, which we're assured will be a sister-model, rather than a replacement. Recent history has seen Canon release new models every 18 months-or-so but it's been a busy year with newcomers such as the Nikon D300 getting a lot of attention in the 40D's keen-amateur/professional segment. The 50D is essentially a 40D body wrapped around a newly-developed 15 megapixel sensor that finally rectifies the situation in which Canon's XXD range trailed the company's entry-level line, in pixel terms. Canon is claiming that the new sensor's design (new manufacturing processes, redesigned photo diodes and micro lenses) mean that despite the higher resolution image noise has improved, something we'll be putting to the test later. The other big change is the inclusion of a new, high-resolution LCD screen. 920,000 dots mean that it can convey 640 x 480 RGB pixels, making it effectively a VGA standard monitor. Three anti-reflection layers built into the screen do their best to keep it useable in bright conditions, too. There are various other changes and added features, with many of them stemming from the first appearance of the Canon's Digic 4 processor. The key differences between the 50D and 40D are detailed below.
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS-5D Mark II (9/17/2008)
    21.1 Megapixel CMOS sensor (full frame)
    Back in August 2005 Canon 'defined a new DSLR category' (their words) with the EOS 5D. Unlike any previous 'full frame' sensor camera, the 5D was the first with a compact body (i.e. not having an integral vertical grip) and has since then proved to be very popular, perhaps because if you wanted a full frame DSLR to use with your Canon lenses and you didn't want the chunky EOS-1D style body then the EOS 5D has been your only choice. Three years on and two competitors have turned up in the shape of the Nikon D700 and Sony DSLR-A900, and Canon clearly believes it's time for a refresh. So here is the 5D Mark II, which punches high in terms of both resolution and features, headlining: 21 megapixels, 1080p video, 3.0" VGA LCD, Live view, higher capacity battery. In other words, a camera that aims to leapfrog both its direct rivals, either in terms of resolution (in the case of the D700) or features (in the case of the DSLR-A900). Full detail below.
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS-500D (3/25/2009)
    15.1 Megapixel CMOS sensor (1.6 crop)
    Just 14 months after the launch of the EOS Rebel XSi (450D), Canon has unveiled its latest model, the Rebel T1i (500D). It's the fifth generation of Rebel and enters the market at a difficult time - in the midst of a global economic downturn and against the fiercest competition we've ever seen in the entry-level DSLR sector. So what has Canon done to make this latest model in the longest-established family in the sector live up to the edgy and exciting image implied by its US naming? The 500D/T1i doesn't quite have to be the everyman camera that its predecessors were. The introduction of the Rebel XS (1000D) in June 2008 means the T1i no longer has to appeal to everybody who doesn't want to stretch to buying into the 50D class. As a result, the 450D was able to bulk up its feature set to include a selection of features that price-conscious shoppers don't necessarily realize they want, such as a larger viewfinder and spot metering. The result was probably the most complete Rebel we'd seen.
    __________________________________________________


    Canon EOS-7D (3/25/2009)
    18.0 Megapixel CMOS sensor (1.6 crop)
    With a host of brand new features designed to enhance every facet of the photographic process, from still images to video, the new EOS 7D represents a whole new class of camera.

    Made to be the tool of choice for serious photographers and semi-professionals, the EOS 7D features an all-new 18.0 Megapixel APS-C size CMOS sensor and Dual DIGIC 4 Image Processors, capturing tremendous images at up to ISO 12800 and speeds of up to 8 fps. The EOS 7D has a new all cross-type 19-point AF system with improved AI Servo AF subject tracking and user-selectable AF area selection modes for sharp focus no matter the situation. The EOS 7D's Intelligent Viewfinder, an entirely newly-designed technology, provides 100% coverage and displays user-selected AF modes as well as a spot metering circle and on demand grid lines. New iFCL Metering with 63-zone dual-layer metering system uses both focus and color information to provide accurate exposure even in difficult lighting. The EOS 7D also captures Full HD video at 30p (29.97 fps), 24p (23.976 fps) and 25p with an array of manual controls, including manual exposure during movie shooting and ISO speed selection. The EOS 7D features a magnesium alloy body that is dust- and weather-resistant and shutter durability of up to 150,000 cycles. Compatible with over 60 EF and EF-S lenses as well as with EOS System accessories, the creative opportunities - not just with stills but also with video - are beyond amazement.

    __________________________________________________

    References:
    http://www.dpreview.com
    http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/co...categoryid=111
    Last edited by Dan; 12-12-2007 at 04:01 PM.

  2. #2
    Level 3 User
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    usa
    Posts
    698

    Default

    I once had a teacher who, despite having the latest and greatest 1Ds-series cameras, swore that the D60 was the best all around Canon SLR.

  3. #3
    Reality Hacker Dan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    3,785

    Default

    I used my new 5D for the first time last night.

    Full frame is too awesome. Lenses are so much wider. With the 20D and 50mm Id be backed up against the wall in my studio to get a models full body shot. Now with the 5D and same lens I can stand almost 10' closer and get the same results.

    Bigger viewfinder, bigger screen... I love it already and I haven't even looked at the images yet.

  4. #4
    Level 2 User Village Idiot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Durt Burg, WV
    Posts
    284

    Default

    I would like a 5D or whatever replacement is eventually coming out for it one day.

    Pictures from the 5D just have a superb image quality. Can't relly compare it to the rest of Canon's lower end cameras.
    I am so smart. I am so smart. "S" "M" "R" "T". I mean, "S" "M" "A" "RRRRRR" "T" - Mr. Simpson

  5. #5
    Level 3 User
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Leesburg, VA
    Posts
    135

    Default

    Dan,
    You got a 5D??? I usually don't envy gear but on this note... you have a camera body I really do covet. Congrats! I know exactly what you mean by the wide angle aspect.

    I used my neighbors for a few projects recently, and loved it. I am going to see if Canon releases a new full frame in vegas or ny this year before I jump to buy one.
    CelticRaven
    ~Sarcasm is my superpower~

  6. #6
    Level 2 User Village Idiot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Durt Burg, WV
    Posts
    284

    Default

    There's been rumors. It is over due. I'm just wondering if it'll stay about the $2500 mark. Wasn't the 5D originally like $3000+?

    Edit: Fortunately I have one EF S lens and it cost me less than $100. I'm really only interested in the expensive L's now.
    I am so smart. I am so smart. "S" "M" "R" "T". I mean, "S" "M" "A" "RRRRRR" "T" - Mr. Simpson

  7. #7
    Reality Hacker Dan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    3,785

    Default

    If you want rumors on the 5D replacement there is hours of reading here:

    http://photography-on-the.net/forum/...splay.php?f=83

    Not really worth the read tho until we hear something official.

  8. #8
    Level 3 User
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Leesburg, VA
    Posts
    135

    Default

    Dan,
    On potn, I almost only stay in the C&C sections of the boards there. There is to much whining and arguing about the smallest features, from people who are more impressed to the price of their gear then the pictures it will take. I'll wait for the official announcement. My guess is NY in march.
    CelticRaven
    ~Sarcasm is my superpower~

  9. #9
    Reality Hacker Dan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    3,785

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CelticRaven View Post
    Dan,
    On potn, I almost only stay in the C&C sections of the boards there. There is to much whining and arguing about the smallest features, from people who are more impressed to the price of their gear then the pictures it will take. I'll wait for the official announcement. My guess is NY in march.
    Yea... thats why I said " Not really worth the read".

    I say jan/feb.

  10. #10
    Reality Hacker Dan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    3,785

    Thumbs down

    This thread has been updated with the latest Canon goodies.

  11. #11
    Level 3 User Jeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Martinsburg, WV
    Posts
    1,172

    Default

    um, the photo for the 5DMKII is the same as the 5D. But I'm sure you knew that.

  12. #12
    Reality Hacker Dan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    3,785

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff View Post
    um, the photo for the 5DMKII is the same as the 5D. But I'm sure you knew that.
    Fixed it, just had my link wrong.

  13. #13
    Level 3 User Jeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Martinsburg, WV
    Posts
    1,172

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan View Post
    Fixed it, just had my link wrong.
    See, you knew about it though right?

  14. #14
    Reality Hacker Dan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    3,785

    Default

    The new Canon 7D has been added.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •